Former Minneapolis police officer charged with illegally acquiring controlled substances, extortion, violating civil rights

Former Minneapolis police officer charged with illegally acquiring controlled substances, extortion, violating civil rights Photo: KSTP-TV.

Tommy Wiita
Updated: November 06, 2020 03:51 PM
Created: November 06, 2020 03:01 PM

On Friday, the United States Attorney's Office announced charges for a former Minneapolis police officer that involve acquiring controlled substances, extortion and violating civil rights.

Charges state Ty Raymond Jindra, 28, faces an 11-count indictment that involves acquiring controlled substances by deception, extortion under color of official right and deprivation of rights under color of law. Jindra, who was taken into custody earlier Friday, made his first court appearance on Friday as well.

According to the allegations in the indictment, from September 2017 through October 2019, Jindra abused his position in order to obtain and attempt to obtain controlled substances including methamphetamine, heroin, oxycodone, cocaine and other drugs by deception, extortion and conducting unconstitutional searches and seizures.

The allegations go on to say, as part of his scheme, Jindra diverted controlled substances for his own purposes by various means in the course of his duties as a police officer for the Minneapolis Police Department. He would not report, log or place the controlled substances into evidence, nor would he inform his partner or other officers on scene about the substances that he had confiscated. Charges state, on some occasions, the former officer would find ways to interact with or search an individual, vehicle or residence without his partner's knowledge. At times, Jindra would turn off his body-worn camera when he found, concealed or diverted controlled substances he lawfully possessed in the course of his duties as an officer.

U.S. Attorney Erica MacDonald gave thanks in a release to the FBI for its skilled investigative work on the case, as well as MPD for its immediate notification to the FBI.

In total, Jindra faces six counts of acquiring controlled substances by deception; two counts for extortion under color of official right; and three counts of depravation of rights under color of law. 

According to public data, Jindra had 14 complaints reported in the last four years, none of which resulted in disciplinary action when he was a part of MPD.


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